In this photo:
In the dining room, a reclaimed wood table from Restoration Hardware pairs with S chairs by Verner Panton. Margarita Cabrera’s riotous copper butterflies emit a statement about U.S. and Mexican relations at la frontera. On the floor, The Art Guys’ Study for Piano for Remote Performer (first performed in 1992).
In this photo:
The French plaster chandelier in the dining room was a find from Found. About the flock of butterflies that encircle it, Farber recalls, “It took [Texas artist] Margarita Cabrera three full days to install these with tiny nails hammered into each and every one.” The Cabrera piece was commissioned through Walter Maciel Gallery, Los Angeles.
In this photo:
Dining room as installation. Farber, in dress and collar by Au Jour Le Jour from Laboratoria, with a favorite work: Margarita Cabrera’s The Craft of Resistance, 2008, a creative product of the sculptor’s residency at Artpace in San Antonio. The Mitchell Center director points out some of the sociopolitical content: “The installation was created by Cabrera with a team of volunteers in a factory-like environment, an allusion to the maquiladoras found in Mexico. The copper sculptures are a metaphor for migration and have the impression of an American penny on the outside of each wing, alluding to the power and impact of the U.S. currency.”
In this photo:
Across the mantel, from left: A Tony Feher drawing scored at the DiverseWorks Luck of the Draw fund-raiser earlier this year. Claude van Lingen’s graphite, I Am Right, You Are Wrong, 2004, another auction find. Dario Robleto’s Untitled (Shadows Evade the Sun I) and Untitled (Shadows Evade the Sun II), 2012, from Inman Gallery, based on images snapped by random fans during concerts.
In this photo:
In the sunroom/breakfast room, the Mitchell Center’s director catches up on art reading. Vintage table by Eero Saarinen, with contemporary chairs from Design Within Reach. Chandelier is Zettel’z by Ingo Maurer. “The paper is Japanese paper, and we have added to the notes by asking friends and family to create new ones,” Farber says. She wears a Suno top and Zero + Maria Cornejo pants, both from Leap; shoes by Miu Miu from Saks Fifth Avenue; cuff and earrings by Michael Spirito, Sloan/Hall.
In this photo:
The sunroom does double duty as play area.
In this photo:
Vintage Gibson F4 mandolins, 1922, 1912 and 1927.
In this photo:
The piano is a 1914 Steinway Model O. Stella, age 2, prepares to play, while Julian, age 4, strikes up the bow on his very own mini violin. In the background (left), a gift from Venice Biennale-exhibited James Drake, the artist’s Black Bird, White Mirror, 2011; Drake represented by Moody Gallery. On the right wall, William Betts’ Range of Motion, 2005, one of the Farbers’ first acquisitions made upon moving to Houston; the artist is now a good friend and on their collecting radar (represented by McClain Gallery).
In this photo:
In the living room, Farber wears a pleated vinyl skirt and blouse, both by Lover, from Laboratoria. Julian gives a performance. Foreground: Rachel Hecker’s Nobody Called: Everything you ever wanted to know about yourself or someone else can be found within the outskirts of your life, 2006, from Texas Gallery, a gift from husband Stephan after Julian’s birth.
  • 194522
  • 194523
  • 194524
  • 194525
  • 194526
  • 194527
  • 194528
  • 194529
  • 194530
8 of 10