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The 14-by-4-foot kitchen counter mixes a stainless-steel work space with an L-shaped composite quartz inset. Walnut cabinetry. Custom stone-and-marble backsplash. Lighting by Artemide Logico.
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David Cadwallader designed the limestone fireplace surround in the living room. Still Life painting by Chung Gang Wang. Knoll glass-and-steel coffee table.
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All seating in the serenely neutral living room was reupholstered. The original plaster ceiling was sanded down to a smooth finish; new windows replicate the originals. Crystal lamp from Visual Comfort.
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Japanese artist Misako Inaoka’s Organic Imprints is a series of miniature mixed-media constructions on handmade wood shelves. Her “invented creatures” incorporate dried kelp, coral, shell, seeds, pods, wood, resin and plastic toys.
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Four linoleum block prints, created by daughter Lily in kindergarten, flank the window above an antique bench, one of the Barneses’ first purchases when they moved to Dallas in 1983. Cube pendant from Visual Comfort.
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The custom banquette is covered in Designtex fabric. Cadwallader designed the walnut table with steel base. Cassina Cab leather-wrapped chairs (and kitchen stools) from Scott + Cooner.
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Twin leather armchairs — separated by Global Views’ Step-Up Table — are family favorites; new velveteen pillows were made to visually tie them to the rest of the setting. James Paterson art was purchased at TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art. Armani Casa coffee table.
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Beneath the mid-century Lou Blass Supernova chandelier, the dining room features a Giorgetti Artu rosewood table from Scott + Cooner and graceful Ribbon armchairs from David Edward. The nine-piece encaustic work Dogma of Color was created by Jason Willaford specifically for the Barnes home.
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Artist Jessica Drenk spent 12 hours on a ladder assembling Bibliophylum II. The site-specific piece was created from vintage books dipped in hot beeswax, allowed to harden, and cut into fossil- and feather-like strips. Each is mounted individually to form an elliptical shape.
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Homeowners Gerald and Debbie Barnes. The sleek iron banister replaced the original scrollwork version.
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