Fashion / Shopping

Black-Owned Dallas Beauty, Fashion, and Wellness Brands to Support

Local Creators and Businesses That Deserve Our Attention — Now and Always

BY // 06.03.20

As protests continue across the world, sparked by the killing of an unarmed Black man, George Floyd, in Minneapolis and fueled by centuries of systemic racism, many are wondering what additional actions they can take to show continued support. Small businesses have been in desperate need of help since the pandemic took hold of Dallas earlier this year, and small, Black-owned businesses deserve our particular attention. Below, we’re highlighting some shops, salons, and brands to support and fall in love with right now.

What brands, shops, and creators did we miss? Please email me to let us know.

Gabe Jade

To see a Gabe Jade tie, bowtie, or headwrap is to instantly fall in love. The beautiful accessories were dreamed up by Ade Ogbomo after going on a mission to find a bowtie for her nephew — he wanted something as vibrant as her African dresses. She had no luck, so she made her own.

 

Indigo 1745 black-owned dallas business
Indigo 1745 (far left) is situated on a popular stretch of Dallas’ Bishop Arts District.

Indigo 1745

Occupying Bishop Arts’ bustling W. 7th street since 2006 (when the neighborhood was sorely lacking apparel shops), Indigo 1745 is the vision of two UT Austin grads and husband and wife duo Keith and Denise Manoy.

A Tribe Called Sprinters

Led by the effervescent Crystal Pollard, a Tribe Called Sprinters makes running joyful. Pollard has also been leading the Everyday People Combine, to give the local sneaker set an annual (and approachable) way to measure their fitness progress. Last year, Nike was a partner.

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  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
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  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)
  • Christopher Martin Gallery 1 - DALLAS (Art)

 

Hance Taplin. Photo Doug Klembara.

By Way of Dallas

Hance Taplin has a Midas touch when it comes to streetwear, except, instead of gold, everything he has a hand in becomes effortlessly cool. And By Way of Dallas isn’t just locally based — his goal is to help change the way the world sees our city’s culture.

Adwoa Beauty

A former co-worker of mine once called Julian Addo’s Adwoa Beauty the “Glossier for kinky hair (except so much more).” It was a solid comparison — Adwoa’s branding is minimalistic and the showroom in the Cedars neighborhood is not unlike Glossier’s exceptionally photogenic, gallery-like setups — but the community the New York-raised Addo is building in Dallas is something entirely her own.

 

Don Morphy Privé Clothiers

Just a few short years ago, founder Daniel Mofor left a career as a computer engineer at Walmart to pursue his true passion: custom suits. Often blending wool and cashmere and made with an athletic build in mind, his designs have become favorites of stars like Emmitt Smith, Dwight Howard, and Tyson Chandler.

 

Dallas fashion designer Venny Etienne, measuring fabric for masks at his Levenity studio.
Dallas fashion designer Venny Etienne, measuring fabric for masks at his Levenity studio.

Levenity 

First, his pieces found their way to Cardi B (the star was photographed in a Levenity python skin coat just after her meteoric rise clinched Billboard’s number one spot), then, Venny Etienne made his way to our TV screens, as a contestant on season 17 of Project Runway. The Haitian-American designer has been creating face masks with a fervor over the last few months, but his luxurious womenswear is forever worth coveting.

Luxxy Brown and Skin Studio

Founded by esthetician Mesha Williams, Luxxy Brow and Skin takes a holistic approach to skincare (and can shape some killer brows) offering bespoke treatments from an airy studio in Uptown.

Olphactory Candles

A passion project turned full-fledged collection, Olphactory Candles was created by detective Brant Anderson, who wanted to smell something nice after a long day on the job. Hand-poured coconut cream candles come in strong, sophisticated scents, with packaging that serves as a nod to Anderson’s love of jazz.

 

GritByBrit_DesignDistrict-45 dallas black-owned businesses
courtesy of Grit Fitness

Grit Fitness

Grit Fitness has become such a staple of Dallas’ boutique fitness scene; it’s hard to fathom how it’s only been around since 2015. In addition to her killer dance cardio, spin, yoga, and kickboxing classes, Brittani Rettig’s girl power ethos is readily found in pop-up workouts and local partnerships across the city. Also, the branding is always on point (see: a genuinely cute face mask).

*For the month of June, Grit Fitness is donating 50 percent of single class sales to the NAACP.

Bree Clarke

What began as source for handcrafted modern farmhouse tables (The Iman Project) has grown into so much more. From design workshops (now held virtually) to the welcoming, creative space that is The Little House on Routh, Bree Clarke has crafted some beautiful things into existence in Dallas.

Taylor and Tess

The Dallas beauty brand utilizes and educates on hemp-derived CBD, but the edited line of products don’t just stop there. African black soap made in Texas is packed with antioxidants. A rich nighttime cream delivers cell regenerating vitamin C and E in high concentrations. For more to love, Taylor and Tess‘ sustainably made packaging is also absolutely stunning.

Jeremy Biggers
Jeremy Biggers creates lip paintings, dipped in gold.

Jeremy Biggers

Jeremy Biggers’ eye-catching work can be found all around Dallas, from murals in Deep Ellum and immersive installations in Victory Park’s Sweet Tooth Hotel, to the newly opened Virgin Hotel. His most recent work: a Nipsey Hussle tribute in South Oak Cliff.

Curls Organic Hair Care

Mahisha Dellinger moved to Dallas from California and made millions with her natural hair care line, Curl. Then, she scored a show on Oprah’s OWN network where she mentors black female business owners.

 

Pressed Roots founder Piersten Gaines blowouts blow dry bar dallas (Photo by Misael Rodriguez) Hance Taplin dallas black-owned businesses
Pressed Roots founder Piersten Gaines in the Trinity Groves salon. (Photo by Misael Rodriguez)

Pressed Roots

Piersten Gaines had just begun executing her vision for a new kind of Drybar (one that caters to textured hair) before the pandemic took hold of the city. Now, the inaugural location in Trinity Groves for Pressed Roots — which swaps the aforementioned brand’s pops of yellow for a more spa-like ambience — is welcoming clients again, and could set the template for a future empire.

Winding Wick Candles

With sweet flavors like “Poison Apple” and “Frooty Loops,” Winding Wicks Candles, founded by a stay-at-home Dallas mom Tiana Coats, offers out of-the-box scents that have become massive hits on Etsy. Coats is currently donating 10 percent of sales to the NAACP.

Koffee Day Spa

The downtown Dallas day spa, founded by Thai Morrison, offers facials, massages, and body treatments for all skin types, and will even bring Koffee Day Spa treatments to your private event.

The Artistry of Essential Oils

Founded by breast cancer survivor and certified aromatherapist Valencia McClure, the Frisco-based brand offers aromatic skincare and essential oil blends that can aid with both energy, sleep, and beyond.

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