Restaurants / Openings

Ross Demers’ New Restaurant is Approachable Fine Dining at Its Best in Old East Dallas

Cry Wolf Is a Cozy Spot, Serving Ever-Changing Bites and Creative Cocktails

BY // 01.13.22

Filled with old records, books, and cozy booths, chef Ross Demers’ newly opened concept in Old East Dallas, Cry Wolf, is approachable fine dining done just right. Demers’ resume, for those unfamiliar, includes stints at  Beverley’s and the impressive —  but now shuttered — Flora Street Café, as well as his own Deep Ellum restaurant called On the Lamb.

The intimate Cry Wolf features just seven tables, a 14-seat bar, and one table for two outside. A chill soundtrack and one small candle at each table provide a comfortable ambiance.

“We want guests to enjoy simple but progressive dining in a more approachable way,” Demers tells PaperCity about the new spot. “The idea is to take away the stuffiness that ‘fine dining’ establishments often create, rip away the white table cloths, and enjoy good food. Come as you are and leave feeling like you stepped out of your comfort zone a bit and tasted something you never thought you would eat, and enjoy it.”

Dishes at Cry Wolf will constantly evolve. “We use only fresh product that comes in daily,” Demers explains. “Sometimes a dish is conceived in the morning and put on the menu that night.” Naturally, you won’t be able to hunt down a regular Cry Wolf menu online, but the surprise is part of the fun.

Cry Wolf Dallas Ross Demers
Cry Wolf’s pappardelle with rock shrimp and black trumpet mushrooms was a favorite of the night. (Photo by Megan Ziots)

On a recent visit, we tried the bluefin sashimi served atop a crispy chicken thigh and garnished with truffles. This was our first favorite of the night. Our second was the pappardelle with rock shrimp and black trumpet mushrooms. The Amish chicken was also delicious; it felt as if you could cut through it with a fork if you wanted to. I’ve never had chicken so tender and light.

Much of Cry Wolf seems to be a collaborative experience with the staff. “The cocktail list is headed by our bartender Brandon Mitchell who is a very talented mixologist, however, several other members of the staff have contributed to drinks here and there,” he says.

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Two stand-out drinks of the evening were the Rosenectar Martini (a vodka, rosewater concoction) and The Irish Teedub with whiskey, chamomile, and elderflower. If you’re more adventurous, you can try the Asian-influenced Mal’s Bright Idea with tequila, yuzu, ume plum, and shiso or The Magic Mule — your standard gin mule plus pea flower that transforms the color of your drink before your eyes.

The Cry Wolf location, formerly home to a Subway, was chosen for a reason. “My partner Melanie and I used to live on Junius Street and always had an affinity for Old East Dallas,” Demers explains. Though he was originally looking at Lower Greenville (a prime location for hot new restaurants at the moment), the chef ultimately went with his favorite neighborhood.

“The response has been very affirming,” he says. We’re not surprised. Cry Wolf makes a solid addition to lauded Old East Dallas spots like Petra and the Beast, Loro, and Khao Noodle Shop — solid company to keep.

Cry Wolf is now taking reservations on Resy for dinner on Tuesday through Sunday from 5 pm to 11 pm.

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